NFT News

Hackers gained access to the official Instagram account of the Bored Ape Yacht Club and stole about $3 million in NFTs.

Once again, the apes have been targeted by hackers.

The official Instagram account of the Bored Ape Yacht Club was hacked on Monday morning, and four of the NFTs, as well as additional Yuga Labs NFTs, were stolen.

The official BAYC Instagram account was hacked this morning, according to a tweet from the Bored Ape Yacht Club yesterday afternoon. “The hacker provided a bogus Airdrop link to a clone of the BAYC website, where users were asked to sign a’safeTransferFrom’ transaction.” “As a result, their valuables were moved to the scammer’s wallet.”

Some users were deceived into thinking that by clicking the link, they might create a new feature for their NFTs. Instead, it allowed the hacker to gain access to their Ethereum assets and steal them.

Zachxbyt, a digital investigator, looked at the addresses that interacted with the phishing site and concluded that around $3 million in NFTs were taken, with the majority ($2.4 million) coming from just a few uncommon NFTs.

According to Zachbxt of Artnet News, the hacker sold the stolen NFTs for 761.8 ETH ($2.25 million) and transferred the funds to accounts at Kucoin and Binance, two major cryptocurrency exchanges. According to ARTnews, the attack resulted in the theft of 77 more NFTs.

In later tweets, BAYC informed owners that it had immediately contacted the community and blocked links to the hijacked Instagram account from its platforms after finding the hack. Two-factor authentication was activated at the time of the intrusion, according to the report.

When BAYC restored control of the account, they launched an investigation into how the hacker got access, with the help of Instagram.

“You must contact us first—anyone approaching you initially is not us,” it said, urging people affected or anybody with information to contact them through email. We will never contact anyone by email beforehand, and we will never request your seed phrase.”

BAYC did not react to a request for comment sent directly to them.

NFTs from bored apes have been stolen in the past. Todd Kramer, a New York art dealer, tweeted a desperate plea in December, stating, “I been hacked. All of my apes have vanished. Please assist me as this item has just sold.”

Thieves had accessed his digital wallet and taken at least 15 artworks worth $2.2 million, including five from the high-profile Bored Ape Yacht Club collection.

The works were allegedly taken from Kramer’s “hot wallet,” which is a gadget that is always linked to the internet as opposed to the more secure, physical “cold wallet,” which must be plugged in to connect to the internet. Kramer was able to rescue some of the pieces with the support of community members and online activists.

A hacker obtained access to the Bored Ape Discord server a few weeks ago through a phishing link placed in one of the channels. At least one Bored Ape NFT was stolen as a result of the incident.

In a tweet, the BAYC team stated it had promptly identified the problem, but urged users not to mint any NFTs using a Discord link. It also informed users that no April Fools’ Day stealth mints were in the works.

We are the biggest NFT marketing agency with the reach over 30 million people.

This article is just for educational purposes.

Make your own exploration before making any form of investment, as always.

Possessors, holders, suckers, members of the community, jumbos. Want to give your composition a boost by putting it at the top of the homepage? == > Get in touch with us!

Related Articles

4 Comments

  1. I have been exploring for a bit for any high-quality articles or weblog posts in this sort of house . Exploring in Yahoo I at last stumbled upon this web site. Reading this info So i am satisfied to express that I have an incredibly excellent uncanny feeling I discovered just what I needed. I most indubitably will make sure to don?¦t put out of your mind this site and provides it a look on a continuing basis.

  2. My spouse and I stumbled over here from a different web address and thought I should check things out. I like what I see so now i am following you. Look forward to finding out about your web page for a second time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button